The Sjogren’s connection

One night, halfway through my daughter’s evening “cluster feeding” session, where she nurses for hours gathering all the calories she’ll need for several hours of sleep (NOT COMPLAINING that she sleeps 7, 8, sometimes 9 hours at night), my husband brought me a glass of water.  Dutifully, he had read that everytime you nurse you should drink a glass of water.  More water = more milk, as one of my nurses had said.  “Here you go, my dry wife.”

“Oh my God,” I said.  “That’s it!”  Eureka – maybe it’s the Sjogren’s!

As I type this, I have a dry mouth and I’m wondering where my water is.  It’s not because I’m breastfeeding.  It’s because I have an extremely mild case of Sjogren’s syndrome, diagnosed about four years ago by none other than an opthamologist.  I had been experiencing discomfort with my contact lenses, and it turns out I had developed cysts under my eyelids from dry eye and from not changing out my contacts enough, and wearing them too long during the day.  My doctor, concerned about a woman so young having dry eye like me, sent me to a specialist in autoimmune diseases.  The specialist listened to my case and a blood test confirmed his (and my doctor’s) suspicions: I had Sjogren’s syndrome.  It rarely shows up in women younger than 40, and as it was I seemed to have a mild, manageable case – even my bloodtest was borderline, my results being the lowest count of antibodies you can have and still be considered to have the disease.

In Sjogren’s, your body’s moisture producing glands don’t produce enough moisture.  Oh, don’t worry, I still sweat plenty.  But I’m always thirsty – rather, I need liquids to help me swallow my food.  I have had a ton of cavities though I take care of my teeth – because I don’t make enough saliva to kill the bacteria in my mouth.  I have dry skin and moisturize daily, even in the summer.  And I have dry eye.  It’s really not that bad, compared to people who have to take medication for their Sjogren’s.  I’m good with just a few changes to my routine. A year of Restasis, for instance, rid me of the cysts on my eyes and I’m vigilant about changing my contacts on time and not wearing them for 16 hours a day.

While there’s sparse studies linking Sjogrens to trouble with breastfeeding, there is anecdotal evidence on the internet. And it seems logical to me. Rather than reiterate what is out there, here is my favorite article by a Sjogrens formula-feeding mom:

Fearless Formula Feeder – Sjogrens

But if you need something more scientific, here’s a great response on a breastfeeding website:

Medical professional response about breastfeeding with Sjogren’s

When I had my eureka moment, my wonderful husband shared in my response. “That makes a lot of sense,” he said, and reiterated his support for making a bottle of formula whenever needed.

Love him.

Still, I said before that I had two theories about medical conditions preventing me from having a great milk supply, and the second reason is a little more graphic and personal. It is also pure speculation on my part – it’s never been confirmed by a doctor, but then again I never brought it up. How do you explain to your doctor that you think your breasts are shaped weird?

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