Participate, educate, and be heard

Yeah, so that Affordable Health Care Act review isn’t going to happen. I have a million excuses to use, most of which include my kids, but which also includes the daunting website itself. I underestimated the amount of free time I would have. But free time starts out as a fantasy with a newborn and increases exponentially as they get older.  And it’s only worse with another toddler added into the mix. So it’s a no-go… at least for now.

Fortunately we are only less than two years away from choosing the next president. This is a chance for you, as a voter, to ask whether policy makers will support your reproductive rights, support funding for treatment of your diagnosis, and support ARTs.  For an idea of where potential candidates stand on this issue – because for most politicians, and probably for a great deal of the general public, “reproductive rights” is a euphemism for right-to-life/abortion rights – you’ll probably have to dig a little deeper into their speeches and voting histories.  I just Googled “where does Marco Rubio stand on infertility treatments” and got a big fat nothing, though there is already some chatter about whether he’ll stick with the Catholic Church’s doctrine on that.  But it’s early in the campaigning and if someone, somewhere, asked anybody about anything it’s probably going to be documented somewhere…

…And it might also be spun somewhere.  So while we’re learning about what Hillary is going to do for the little people (aka. the village raising the children), or how Dr. Paul is going to get government out of the way for people, remember that there are few independent unbiased voices in the fray.  Media outlets – conservative and liberal alike – don’t always tell the entire story.  Candidates – heck, even senators, representatives, and probably your mayor if s/he’s running for reelection – are coached to say words that sound like answers but are really vague statements that are either so eloquent or so obtuse that we forget what the original question was in the first place and by the end we are ready to move on.  It’s kind of like looking at a Jackson Pollock.

One: Number 31, 1950

It’s substantive.  It’s impressive.  And it might even make you feel something, although this one makes me feel dissonance, like my eyes are listening to static.  Then you feel, “But is it art?”  And then you wonder if that was his message all along, and we’ll never know, because once art is viewed it becomes an experience shaped by both the viewer and the artist alike.

…See what I mean?  Back to the point – voting is only democratic when it happens in the aggregate.  Like choosing organic at the supermarket – alone you might feel like it doesn’t make a huge difference, but if enough people do it we begin to see change in choices.  Voting with your money is yet another way to use your voice. And infertilites already have voices on the outskirts of the mainstream.

Participate, educate, and be heard.

 

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