My Amendment to H.R. 1628

Thanks to the behind-closed-doors method the Senate is using to try to pass TrumpCare, you now have the opportunity to request that your personal health care premiums not increase by any passing of the bill.  You submit your amendment and ultimately your Senator can decide whether or not to bring it up for inclusion in the bill.  It is then introduced, read, debated, and voted on.  You can learn about the whole process at http://www.ouramendments.org and submit your personalized amendment there.

Some of the essential agreements of the amendment are:

  • [your name] shall not experience a rise in health insurance premiums or a reduction in premium tax credit or assistance with paying cost-sharing.
  • [your name] shall not experience any annual or lifetime limits on coverage; or higher costs due to a pre-existing condition as defined in Section 2705 of the Public Health Services Act.
  • [your name] shall not experience the loss of coverage of any Essential Health Benefits as defined in Section 1302 of the Affordable Care Act or have to pay more in premiums or cost-sharing for coverage including all Essential Health Benefits.

Pre-existing conditions include things like asthma, cancer, and infertility.

Essential Health Benefits include pregnancy, maternity, and newborn care, as well as prescription drugs, lab services, preventive and wellness checks, pediatric services, hospitalization, and emergency care.

I ask you to protect yourself from losing coverage and seeing your premiums increase due to the tax breaks the TrumpCare bill will give to big businesses, like pharmaceutical companies.  Submit your own amendment.  And if you’re up for it, submit your personal story for your Senator to enter into the congressional record, as I did.  For inspiration, here’s what I submitted:

I am a mother of two with a preexisting condition that affected my fertility, a condition which wasn’t discovered until after my doctors declared I was infertile and put me through a battery of tests. I have a Mullerian anomaly – a unicornuate uterus – which means I was born with only one half of my uterus. As a result, many infertility treatments were not feasible due to my congenital abnormality, and I had a high rate of miscarriage as well. When I finally had a viable pregnancy, the fetus suffered from intrauterine growth restriction and was breech. Due to this high risk pregnancy, I had twice-weekly ultrasounds to ensure my baby was growing and healthy. I also had the additional burden of a C-section due to the breech position. I cannot imagine going through this ordeal without the provisions afforded women by Obamacare. I write today on behalf of women everywhere who might have an undiagnosed preexisting condition like mine to respectfully urge the Senate to keep protections for preexisting conditions, to keep funding for essential programs for low-income women like Planned Parenthood, and to keep healthcare affordable by not giving tax cuts to the wealthiest members and businesses.

If you’re so inclined, go ahead and comment with your amendment as well.

I realize it’s not exactly popular for me to have taken a political slant with my blog.  Most of you are probably just curious about what it was like for me to go through everything, and maybe it helps you feel less alone and gives you hope for building your family in whatever capacity that means for you, which brings me such great joy.  Although my infertility struggles are over, I see my role now to be a role model for others, to share everything I learned from the process, and to ensure women are empowered with the information they need to make the best decisions they can for themselves and their (future) families.  That means letting you know when major legislation affecting how infertility, prenatal, and pediatric care might be decreased (or increased!) and giving you the tools to help do something about it.  You may not agree with me, but it does not change the fact that I will continue to advocate for policies that will benefit you through the lens of infertility.  Even if I no longer have a personal need to benefit from those policies.  Maybe that’s just the mom in me.

*I’m not a professional protester, and I have not been paid or hired to write this post.

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The Affordable Care Act and Infertility, Revisited

Several years ago, during the heyday of this blog and my adventure as an infertilite, I wrote a little ditty about how increasing Americans’ access to health care was a good thing, and that the law that would become known as “Obamacare” was particularly good for women.  Little did I know that post would become one of the most read and searched for of all the posts in this blog.

So I’m going to do it again.

On the “verge” of “repealing and replacing” the Affordable Care Act (ACA, aka Obamacare), we face a lot of unknowns about what will actually happen.  A draft of the first version of the bill was circulated just 24 hours ago (notably to news outlets that have been denied entry into the White House Press Room), but it’s still just a draft and there may still be many battles to fight.  Therefore it would be a waste of my time to simply go through the draft and say all the problems that are wrong with it.  Instead, I’d like to give you the information to take to your representatives – local, state, and national – so you can tell them how you, fellow infertilite or concerned citizen, are personally impacted by the benefits of the law.

Are you a woman with health insurance?  If so, you’ve probably noticed that your annual visits to your OB/GYN, mammograms and other screening procedures, and birth control contraceptives are covered.  If you have been pregnant in the last few years, all of your visits pertaining to pregnancy, whether to your general practitioner, a midwife, or MFM specialists, are covered.  The birth is covered, too.  Providing for well-care visits and pregnancy-related care is a national mandate of ACA.  The proposed repeal and replace bill removes the national mandate for insurance companies to cover pregnancy, meaning that it will be up to your state and/or the marketplace to determine how much coverage is provided for and how much you would have to pay out of pocket.  Which means that, should you happen to only have access to plans with minimal coverage, you might have to choose between keeping your electricity on and paying for your hospital stay.  Tell your representatives that providing for pregnancy-related care is a basic human right.

Do you have a pre-existing condition, such as, I don’t know, infertility caused by a uterine abnormality?  Under ACA, an insurance company cannot deny you coverage based on pre-existing conditions.  The draft bill released yesterday keeps most of this part of “Obamacare,” but does limit the kinds of conditions allowed under protection.   Tell your representatives to keep this protection of coverage for all people regardless of pre-existing conditions.

Do you want to wait a few more years to have a child just so you can get a bigger tax break on your insurance?  Currently, the ACA provides subsidies to cover some of the cost of an insurance plan based on your income, so that the burden of coverage is more evenly distributed.  The draft bill proposes that older people, who generally are sick more often and have more medications, would get a bigger tax credit than a healthy 30-year old – almost twice as much.  But where is the equality in this situation when the 30-year old might more likely have one or more dependents who need coverage, and family-level insurance plans aren’t exactly a bargain.  Tell your representatives to keep tax credits for health insurance based on need, not on an arbitrary factor such as age.

Do you think your property taxes are too high?  You might be wondering what property taxes might have to do with health insurance, so let me explain.  Services such as Medicaid are provided by your county in part from federal money that they are granted.  Republicans have talked about creating “block grants” of money, essentially capping the amount of federal money states have access to, which leaves states, counties, and cities in a terrible predicament: do we cut services to people on Medicaid – for instance, do we close nursing homes which would displace seniors and increase unemployment in our community for the doctors, nurses, and workers who worked there – or do we find another way to pay for it?  And they’ll likely find another way to pay for it through your property taxes.  Tell your representative to keep Medicaid expansion.

Finally, I’m going to address the issue of Planned Parenthood, which under the Republican bill would lose all federal funding.  Supposedly because, and solely because, it provides access to abortion services.  What they don’t tell you is that the other 97% of services provided by Planned Parenthood to men and women across the country include preventative health exams, providing contraception, tests and treatments for STIs, Pap smears, breast exams, and outreach to schools and college campuses.  One in five women have reportedly visited a Planned Parenthood at least once in her life (see the link here).  I know abortion is a highly personal topic and questions about life run so morally deep I can’t even begin to illustrate the range of them here.  But I do know that this country was settled by a brave group of individuals at Plymouth who were considered outlaws in their home country for their beliefs and who sought to find a place where they could live as they chose in peace.  Tell your representatives to let us continue to live our life as we choose, to keep our choices for what we do with our bodies our decision, not decided for us by lawmakers, and keep the funding in Planned Parenthood.

I will continue to update the blog as progress on the health care bill continues.

My 100th post… It’s a girl!

I am proud to announce the birth of my dearest daughter, who proved once again a little uu can go a long way.

Born via c-section and weighing a whopping (for me) 8 lbs 1 oz, 19.5 inches (the exact same length as her brother), my daughter is a beautiful way to celebrate this blog’s 100th post, springtime, Easter, and to give hope to women TTC everywhere.

Her birth was scheduled since the kids are too close together to do a vbac safely (at least according to my doctor) and I scheduled it for the 39th week. No complications with the pregnancy; her growth was normal and on track, so I didn’t have any big restrictions. A great pregnancy for a great little girl!

Happy New Year!

So I rang in the New Year sober, thanks to my little girl (yes, that’s right, it’s a girl!) whose growth in my UU has been ticking along right on target all these week.  And as my houseguests and DH indulged in glass of wine after glass of wine, or beer after beer, they looked at me with a half-pitying smile and said, “Poor Hope… another New Years sober.”  I don’t like being pitied because I’m pregnant.  I don’t like being pitied for any reason, in fact.

But the truth was, I couldn’t even remember if the 2011-2012 New Years celebration was a sober one for me, either.  Or if the one before that, 2010-2011, was.  They all started to blur together in my mind, especially as the reality of impending infertility began to rear its ugly head.  I think I might have let my guard down three years ago and had a drink or two.  And while many people find New Year’s an occasion to become the reveler you see in movies – doing shot after shot, playing music too loud, getting dressed up in the dead of winter and never wearing a coat – the sadness of my failure as a woman overrode the desire to get a buzz.  Like many other holidays – Christmas especially – it was a somber reminder of the potential memories I would never have: kids falling asleep waiting for the ball to drop, or kids waking me up in their little nightgowns and footie pajamas to tell me it was the new year, or just kids to be thankful for.

I didn’t wake up my son for the celebration of the new year.  I am too protective of his sleep patterns to allow that kind of disruption to take place, but also he’s really blissfully unaware of the meaning of days.  There will come a time he’ll want me to let him stay up.  Instead, I welcomed the new year with a new appreciation of the man my husband has become, to watch him as a father.  I marveled at the family that I thought I would never have – and at the new family member to join us this year – and wondered how I got to be so lucky after what I thought was a dead end.

Girlfriend’s Guide to Simplify Infertility – Bonus Content

Who doesn’t love a bonus?  Ok, this will be my last promotional post about this –

  • collection-image-525-x-644Infertility Summer Reading List Compilation eBook

Fourteen authors in the Infertility Survival Kit share their inspirational infertility stories to help you navigate your journey with excerpts and chapters from their books to create an exclusive Infertility Summer Reading List eBook Compilation. This is a one of a kind eBook that

allows you to preview these books and get a sense for which book(s) best matches your needs. Check out these books in the Infertility Survival Kit and connect with the authors at #ifbooks where you can tweet the authors and learn more about their journey. Ebook compilation includes an exclusive sampler from the Fertile Kitchen Cookbook including recipes.

  • Infertility Insights – Voices Shared, Lessons Learned eBook

We asked the infertility community through blogs and social media to complete the statement, “I wish I would have known…. about infertility”. These voices in the community show their strength and courage by sharing their powerful lessons learned in an effort to help others on their journey. The eBook includes each person’s link in the Infertility Survival Kit so you may connect to them through their social media, blogs and website. Many of them advocate and support this community with a passion to make a difference on your journey.

  • Three Simple Steps to Setting Boundaries with Your Fertile Friends Guide – Renee Wagenner

This quick guide helps you have that difficult conversation with the person in your life that doesn’t know how to support you on your infertility journey. Three simple steps including how to set boundaries with the “Do Do” list.


  • Three Strategies for Taking Charge of Your Fertility – Russell Davis

The eBook was written to help you grow your family, whether through natural or assisted conception, by introducing you to the power of your mind and what it can achieve for you. You can remove the hidden mental obstacles to having a baby as well as influencing your body to create the best possible outcome.

Available now for purchase from my affiliate link:

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A Girlfriend’s Guide to Simplify Infertility – Exclusive Look at Content Cont.

Rounding out the books included in this ginormous collection:

  • collection-image-525-x-644Infertility Road to Hell and Back – Azelene Williams (18.95)

Infertility Road to Hell and Back is a memoir of Azelene’s Williams’ struggle with infertility. What about when that longed for baby never happens? When you realize that something is wrong and turn to professionals for help. Tests are done; treatments tried without success. Instantly connect with Azelene in her heartfelt infertility story.

  • Annual Premium Membership to My Hopeful Journey’s fertility organizer & Quick Start Guide ($60)

One year premium membership includes our comprehensive web and mobile fertility tracker. Organize your medications, appointments, test results, procedures and natural tracking in one place. Create custom reports from full web version, write in a journal, task list and much more.

What are you waiting for?  Support Hope (I’m an affiliate) and buy now:

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A Girlfriend’s Guide to Simplify Infertility – Exclusive Look at Included Content

 

Continuing our exclusive sneak peek at this amazing $19 collection: collection-image-525-x-644

  • The Truth Behind the Secret Infertility – Fran Meadows ($10.95)

 

The Truth Behind The Secret “Infertility” is a memoir that touches on the honesty of struggling to conceive, filled with raw, deep emotions with a taste of witty humor. Readers will relate to the feelings of another woman opening up about things that many dare to share. This book will make you feel less alone and like you are having a conversation with the Author as you read along. Written to give others hope through their journey you will feel the silence and stigma of infertility lift as you read along with showing the real inner strength of a couple shine through many painful experiences.

 

  • The Modern Girl’s Guide to Natural Fertility – Marni Hotchkiss ($15)

 

Natural fertility in today’s modern world encompasses the foods we eat, our behaviors, and our thoughts. Take a deeper look into how tools/apps as well as the right foods and other holistic approaches can positively impact pregnancy success.

Buy now from my affiliate site: 

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