My Amendment to H.R. 1628

Thanks to the behind-closed-doors method the Senate is using to try to pass TrumpCare, you now have the opportunity to request that your personal health care premiums not increase by any passing of the bill.  You submit your amendment and ultimately your Senator can decide whether or not to bring it up for inclusion in the bill.  It is then introduced, read, debated, and voted on.  You can learn about the whole process at http://www.ouramendments.org and submit your personalized amendment there.

Some of the essential agreements of the amendment are:

  • [your name] shall not experience a rise in health insurance premiums or a reduction in premium tax credit or assistance with paying cost-sharing.
  • [your name] shall not experience any annual or lifetime limits on coverage; or higher costs due to a pre-existing condition as defined in Section 2705 of the Public Health Services Act.
  • [your name] shall not experience the loss of coverage of any Essential Health Benefits as defined in Section 1302 of the Affordable Care Act or have to pay more in premiums or cost-sharing for coverage including all Essential Health Benefits.

Pre-existing conditions include things like asthma, cancer, and infertility.

Essential Health Benefits include pregnancy, maternity, and newborn care, as well as prescription drugs, lab services, preventive and wellness checks, pediatric services, hospitalization, and emergency care.

I ask you to protect yourself from losing coverage and seeing your premiums increase due to the tax breaks the TrumpCare bill will give to big businesses, like pharmaceutical companies.  Submit your own amendment.  And if you’re up for it, submit your personal story for your Senator to enter into the congressional record, as I did.  For inspiration, here’s what I submitted:

I am a mother of two with a preexisting condition that affected my fertility, a condition which wasn’t discovered until after my doctors declared I was infertile and put me through a battery of tests. I have a Mullerian anomaly – a unicornuate uterus – which means I was born with only one half of my uterus. As a result, many infertility treatments were not feasible due to my congenital abnormality, and I had a high rate of miscarriage as well. When I finally had a viable pregnancy, the fetus suffered from intrauterine growth restriction and was breech. Due to this high risk pregnancy, I had twice-weekly ultrasounds to ensure my baby was growing and healthy. I also had the additional burden of a C-section due to the breech position. I cannot imagine going through this ordeal without the provisions afforded women by Obamacare. I write today on behalf of women everywhere who might have an undiagnosed preexisting condition like mine to respectfully urge the Senate to keep protections for preexisting conditions, to keep funding for essential programs for low-income women like Planned Parenthood, and to keep healthcare affordable by not giving tax cuts to the wealthiest members and businesses.

If you’re so inclined, go ahead and comment with your amendment as well.

I realize it’s not exactly popular for me to have taken a political slant with my blog.  Most of you are probably just curious about what it was like for me to go through everything, and maybe it helps you feel less alone and gives you hope for building your family in whatever capacity that means for you, which brings me such great joy.  Although my infertility struggles are over, I see my role now to be a role model for others, to share everything I learned from the process, and to ensure women are empowered with the information they need to make the best decisions they can for themselves and their (future) families.  That means letting you know when major legislation affecting how infertility, prenatal, and pediatric care might be decreased (or increased!) and giving you the tools to help do something about it.  You may not agree with me, but it does not change the fact that I will continue to advocate for policies that will benefit you through the lens of infertility.  Even if I no longer have a personal need to benefit from those policies.  Maybe that’s just the mom in me.

*I’m not a professional protester, and I have not been paid or hired to write this post.

My 100th post… It’s a girl!

I am proud to announce the birth of my dearest daughter, who proved once again a little uu can go a long way.

Born via c-section and weighing a whopping (for me) 8 lbs 1 oz, 19.5 inches (the exact same length as her brother), my daughter is a beautiful way to celebrate this blog’s 100th post, springtime, Easter, and to give hope to women TTC everywhere.

Her birth was scheduled since the kids are too close together to do a vbac safely (at least according to my doctor) and I scheduled it for the 39th week. No complications with the pregnancy; her growth was normal and on track, so I didn’t have any big restrictions. A great pregnancy for a great little girl!

“So, is this it?” and other awkward second-baby questions

The experiences of the infertilite in the fertilite world are often befuddling.  I have had such strange advice about having a second child, and even stranger questions, that I usually have to keep from cocking my head to the side and thinking out loud, “Is that really how normal people feel?”  Here is some of what I’ve had to contend with and, in some cases, explain in polite terms.

“I was a surprise, too, and I turned out okay.”  I didn’t hide the fact that I didn’t plan on getting pregnant so quickly after having my son.  But I didn’t plan on it because, as you know, I didn’t think I’d be able to beat the odds for a second time.  As in ever.  So yeah, surprise!  But how do you explain that to someone who doesn’t know the whole history or background, without getting into it and turning it into a weird and awkward conversation?  You don’t.  You just go with it and move on.

“You must have been in shock when you found out [that you were pregnant].”  A close friend asked me this about a month ago while we were having lunch.  And I admitted that yes, yes I was – for the reasons mentioned above.  “You have to remember,” I said to my friend, “I spent most of my maternity leave coming to terms with the fact that I’d have to be satisfied with one child.  That as much as I didn’t want my son to be alone and without siblings, the reality would be that he very likely would.  And that’s when I got pregnant.”  My friend’s eyes went wide as he threw down his sandwich and leaned back in his chair.  “Holy crap!” he said.  “I never even thought of that!”  Yeah, so that’s men for you.  He really didn’t have much to say after that.  I’m pretty sure he’s still processing that information.

“So, is this it?”  This from a nurse, her eyes darting between my 15-month old son and my ready-to-explode belly.  “God bless you,” she said, shaking her head and smiling, as if to say that she felt sorry for me and for the next two years of my life.  But I don’t know how to answer that question, “Is this it?”  I don’t even know how to answer that to my husband.  When one of the OBs in my practice asks me, “And are you having your tubes done, too?” and I say, “No,” even I have to wonder why that’s my answer.  And the best reasons I could think of are this: after years of struggle, heartache, rationalizing, hoping, hurting, and celebrating, it feels like the wrong answer to say “Yes, that’s it,” at this point.  It feels like a huge disrespect to my body, which has given me two incredible gifts after it seemed to have failed me for so long.  In theory, I really don’t want to be pregnant again.  In theory, there are lots of other ways to make sure that doesn’t happen that doesn’t involve further severing an already flawed organ.

Plus, it’s a little gauche to say, “Do I get a discount if I only have one tube tied?”

Happy New Year!

So I rang in the New Year sober, thanks to my little girl (yes, that’s right, it’s a girl!) whose growth in my UU has been ticking along right on target all these week.  And as my houseguests and DH indulged in glass of wine after glass of wine, or beer after beer, they looked at me with a half-pitying smile and said, “Poor Hope… another New Years sober.”  I don’t like being pitied because I’m pregnant.  I don’t like being pitied for any reason, in fact.

But the truth was, I couldn’t even remember if the 2011-2012 New Years celebration was a sober one for me, either.  Or if the one before that, 2010-2011, was.  They all started to blur together in my mind, especially as the reality of impending infertility began to rear its ugly head.  I think I might have let my guard down three years ago and had a drink or two.  And while many people find New Year’s an occasion to become the reveler you see in movies – doing shot after shot, playing music too loud, getting dressed up in the dead of winter and never wearing a coat – the sadness of my failure as a woman overrode the desire to get a buzz.  Like many other holidays – Christmas especially – it was a somber reminder of the potential memories I would never have: kids falling asleep waiting for the ball to drop, or kids waking me up in their little nightgowns and footie pajamas to tell me it was the new year, or just kids to be thankful for.

I didn’t wake up my son for the celebration of the new year.  I am too protective of his sleep patterns to allow that kind of disruption to take place, but also he’s really blissfully unaware of the meaning of days.  There will come a time he’ll want me to let him stay up.  Instead, I welcomed the new year with a new appreciation of the man my husband has become, to watch him as a father.  I marveled at the family that I thought I would never have – and at the new family member to join us this year – and wondered how I got to be so lucky after what I thought was a dead end.

The woman I’ve warned you about is me

I’ve had lots of curious recent discoveries into the world of infertilite mommyhood that I thought I would have been able to avoid, given my own story and situation.  But as I stared into the face of my sister-in-law as we walked through a children’s consignment sale during her 7th month of pregnancy, I realized that I had become my own worst nightmare.  I was the woman with the horror stories about giving birth.  I was the woman who thought it was better to give you the reality check than the comforting words you need to hear.  And I thought I was doing it all for the right reasons.

As it turns out, my advice is probably best suited for only other infertilites.  Although I was aware that my SIL had been told by her doctor she’d never be able to have kids, I didn’t know why and I never asked.  I knew she was devastated at the time, and as such, was (presumably) really psyched to actually be pregnant given her infertilite status.  She’s a very go-with-the-flow kind of free spirit, so I let her lead the way with questions for most of her pregnancy and I avoided mothering her too much.  I was proud of myself for having gotten this far, knowing that along her pregnancy she had some complications of her own – too much amniotic fluid, the baby grew very large, and she kept getting dehydrated.  So when it came time for some SIL-bonding at the sale, I took the opportunity to make sure she was more prepared than I was for the time of the birth.

This was an unfortunate mistake, however.  Because as it turns out, the advice that I have for someone who is pregnant isn’t really relevant for the majority of moms-to-be.  I had biweekly non-stress tests.  The doctors and midwives joked my baby would glow in the dark I had so many ultrasounds, because he didn’t grow to average size.  And I had a baby in the breech position with no chance of even squeezing out a natural birth.  Add in to the equation a few other factors, like the small size of my baby, my passing out hours after the c-section, my lack of labor pains (and them being back labor pains when I did have them all of two times), and my difficulty with breastfeeding, and you’ve got yourself a nightmare for a new mom-to-be.  Yikes!

So, yes, I told her all of these things…  mostly because she asked and was curious, and wanted to know what all of it was like.  But nearly every statement I said had to be qualified or dismissed with something like, “But that’s just because he was breech,” or “That’s just me, that’s not the normal experience.”  And with every piece of advice I could give, other than stocking up on sanitary pads, I became increasingly aware of how awful I must sound and how unhelpful it really was.  She really had no chance of having half the difficulties I did, so why bother scaring her with them?

Now that she’s had the baby, who was born a week after her due date, she’s remained just as relaxed about motherhood as you could imagine a free spirit being.  She’s had no troubles breastfeeding, her baby was a whopping 9 pounds, and she had to be induced.  After 24 hours of labor that went nowhere, the doctors gave her the option for a c-section and she took it.  Realizing how exhausting it had been for me to recover from that surgery – and mine was blissfully scheduled and relaxed, not preceded by a day of labor – my husband and I waited two full days before visiting in the hospital (unlike the rest of the family).  I don’t see a trace of shell-shock in her face, as I imagine mine was full of, and I keep my mouth shut about the aftermath of giving birth.  I nod as I listen because the first few weeks with a newborn are a universal period of unconditional love and personal sacrifice, and we all can relate to that.

In the meantime, I’ll be keeping my stories to myself until the day comes when someone who truly needs to know, for her own health, asks.  And, of course, to all of you – because you wouldn’t be reading my blog unless you hadn’t already wondered.

Girlfriend’s Guide to Simplify Infertility – Bonus Content

Who doesn’t love a bonus?  Ok, this will be my last promotional post about this –

  • collection-image-525-x-644Infertility Summer Reading List Compilation eBook

Fourteen authors in the Infertility Survival Kit share their inspirational infertility stories to help you navigate your journey with excerpts and chapters from their books to create an exclusive Infertility Summer Reading List eBook Compilation. This is a one of a kind eBook that

allows you to preview these books and get a sense for which book(s) best matches your needs. Check out these books in the Infertility Survival Kit and connect with the authors at #ifbooks where you can tweet the authors and learn more about their journey. Ebook compilation includes an exclusive sampler from the Fertile Kitchen Cookbook including recipes.

  • Infertility Insights – Voices Shared, Lessons Learned eBook

We asked the infertility community through blogs and social media to complete the statement, “I wish I would have known…. about infertility”. These voices in the community show their strength and courage by sharing their powerful lessons learned in an effort to help others on their journey. The eBook includes each person’s link in the Infertility Survival Kit so you may connect to them through their social media, blogs and website. Many of them advocate and support this community with a passion to make a difference on your journey.

  • Three Simple Steps to Setting Boundaries with Your Fertile Friends Guide – Renee Wagenner

This quick guide helps you have that difficult conversation with the person in your life that doesn’t know how to support you on your infertility journey. Three simple steps including how to set boundaries with the “Do Do” list.


  • Three Strategies for Taking Charge of Your Fertility – Russell Davis

The eBook was written to help you grow your family, whether through natural or assisted conception, by introducing you to the power of your mind and what it can achieve for you. You can remove the hidden mental obstacles to having a baby as well as influencing your body to create the best possible outcome.

Available now for purchase from my affiliate link:

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A Girlfriend’s Guide to Simplify Infertility – Exclusive Look at Included Content

 

Continuing our exclusive sneak peek at this amazing $19 collection: collection-image-525-x-644

  • The Truth Behind the Secret Infertility – Fran Meadows ($10.95)

 

The Truth Behind The Secret “Infertility” is a memoir that touches on the honesty of struggling to conceive, filled with raw, deep emotions with a taste of witty humor. Readers will relate to the feelings of another woman opening up about things that many dare to share. This book will make you feel less alone and like you are having a conversation with the Author as you read along. Written to give others hope through their journey you will feel the silence and stigma of infertility lift as you read along with showing the real inner strength of a couple shine through many painful experiences.

 

  • The Modern Girl’s Guide to Natural Fertility – Marni Hotchkiss ($15)

 

Natural fertility in today’s modern world encompasses the foods we eat, our behaviors, and our thoughts. Take a deeper look into how tools/apps as well as the right foods and other holistic approaches can positively impact pregnancy success.

Buy now from my affiliate site: 

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